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Juin-Octobre 1985' by Chinese painter Zao Wou-Ki

A ten-metre-long triptych by Zao Wou-Ki — one of the 20th century’s most prominent Chinese painters — fetched $65 million (HK$510 million) at auction Sunday, Sotheby’s Hong Kong said.

Entitled “Juin-Octobre 1985”, the abstract artwork was commissioned personally by the world-renowned Chinese-American architect I.M. Pei.

Zao and Pei were both born to affluent bankers during the Chinese Republican era. They first met in Paris in 1952 and began a long-running friendship, according to the auction house.

The triptych — Zao’s largest work — set a world auction record for the late Chinese-French artist, surpassing the $26 million paid at Christie’s last year for the painting “29.01.64”.

The painting represents a period of Zao’s career which marks “a perfect example of how he merged Eastern and Western techniques and philosophy into the painting,” said Vinci Chang, head of modern Asian art at Sotheby’s, at a preview last week.

Born in China in 1920, Zao moved to Paris in 1948. He was influenced by Western modernism and moved towards abstraction before also returning to Chinese brush-and-ink techniques by the early 1970s, according to Christie’s. He died in 2013.

Source: Sotheby’s

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Genius, formerly known as RapGenius, is a site that explains the complex meanings behind the lyrics in rap songs. The site then went on to add RockGenius to its family of sites. Now after a site relaunch, Dan Gilbert has written a blog where he explains why he chose to invest $40 million with the company. Check out an excerpt below:

Since its debut in 2009, Rap Genius has caught on in a big way among artists and the public, allowing everyone to dive into the lyrics of hip-hop music to find a deeper and better understanding of the creators’ original intent. In addition, the burgeoning company has entered into licensing partnerships with all of the major music publishers, as well as dozens of smaller ones.

Friday, Rap Genius took their concept to a completely new level by re-launching the platform as ‘Genius’ (genius.com). With a new name and a broader scope, Genius takes a huge step toward fulfilling its mission to crowdsource the annotation of ALL TEXT on the internet (that’s right—the entire web).

To read the rest of Dan Gilbert’s blog post, head over to ChooseThinking’s website.

 

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